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    The ATV safety community recently marked the enactment of “Chandler’s Law,” which is aimed at protecting South Carolina’s young ATV riders through rider training, parental supervision, the use of proper safety gear, and prohibitions on children riding adult-sized models.

    The event in the state capitol included South Carolina native Inez Tenenbaum, chairman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Senator Brad Hutto of South Carolina, representatives from the ATV Safety Institute and Pam and Steve Saylor, whose son Chandler died in an ATV crash in 2003. Signed in May by Gov. Nikki Haley, the new law officially took effect on July 1, 2011.

    “At the CPSC, we know that an experienced rider is often a safe rider,” says Tenenbaum. “This is why the new training requirements in Chandler’s Law – the training courses conducted by ASI – are so important.”

    Chandler’s Law is based on Model State ATV Safety Legislation, created by the not-for-profit Specialty Vehicle Institute of America (SVIA). This model legislation has been promoted and proposed to South Carolina and states throughout America by the SVIA for more than two decades.

    “We truly hope that ATV enthusiasts throughout South Carolina, and even across the country, abide by Chandler’s Law, not only to honor his memory, but to dramatically increase their own safety,” says Pam Saylor. “It’s absolutely critical that ATV riders under 16 receive hands-on training by licensed trainers, ride the right size ATV and wear safety gear while operating these vehicles.”